Art & Soul

The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls.  

So said Pablo Picasso, and we couldn’t agree more!  It’s in this spirit that we have recently (yesterday, in fact) reorganized our art and craft supply area.  You’ll find it easier to sort through the goods, and you’ll also see the occasional display sample of what can be made with treasures from our craft stash.   We carry the usual and the unusual, including plenty of found art supplies.  So for all you artists who are Elite Repeat regulars (we know who you are!)–this is for you!

SOLD - Cardboard spools of vintage, rayon seam binding. These little darlings are gone. They sold fast, but the art & craft supplies are restocked several times per week with all kinds of weird and wonderful Art Parts.

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Art Parts

We have art parts beyond the ordinary. 

There are loads of stores that sell found art–that is, original artwork created with things the artist just happened to stumble upon.  And there are a great many stores that sell art supplies.  We are one of only a very few stores in the known universe that sells found art supplies.

Most resale stores don’t deal with ephemera, found objects, dinged-up vintagey bobbles or other marvelous tidbits that can be used to create original artwork.  Ephemera, by the way, are bits and pieces, things that have outlived their purpose but retain a certain appeal because they’re interesting, pretty, memorable or nostalgic.  Ephemera can be printed or written, paper or pot metal or any number of materials that are not intended to be long-lived.

Bottle caps, match books, glass glitter, frozen Charlottes, slightly used tubes of paint, tinsel, beads, old lace, fur trim, buttons, mannequins, photographs, bits of string, rusty things, shiny things and the occasional stuffed peacock–at Elite Repeat, we consider this good junk, and we save it up for artists like you!  (Because, let’s face it, who else would know what to do with it?)

SOLD - Ephemera at Elite Repeat: This is a detail of a photograph of a painting entitled Land of Nod by the British illustrator Susan Beatrice Pearse. We don't know where the original painting is, but in 1927 it was reproduced as a black and white lithograph by the Curtis Publishing Co., courtsey of the Edward Gross Co. of NYC, as an illustration for a children's story. This photo is printed on Kodak Royal Paper and measures 14" x 11".